Guesthouse owners – Mino Warabi http://mino-warabi.com/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 16:56:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mino-warabi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Guesthouse owners – Mino Warabi http://mino-warabi.com/ 32 32 Pittsfield’s historic store, Bud’s Shop & Save, has new owners https://mino-warabi.com/pittsfields-historic-store-buds-shop-save-has-new-owners/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 14:12:29 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/pittsfields-historic-store-buds-shop-save-has-new-owners/

You know it’s been around forever if it’s still called Shop & Save.

I’m not going to lie, to this day I sometimes let the words “Shop & Save” come out of my mouth when referring to Hannaford. For real … when this change happened, how long did you keep saying Shop & Save? I bet it took months to get it right. What was it … at the end of the 90s that changed?

That said, that should give you a pretty clear indication of how long Pittsfield has been home to Bud’s Shop & Save. There are still a handful of independent S&S in this part of the state. For example, there is another at Dover-Foxcroft. But, now Bud’s in Pittsfield is taken over by a well-known local grocery dynasty.

The owners of Danforth in Hermon will take over Bud’s.

That’s right, the owners of Hermon’s Danforth Downhome supermarket have taken over Bud’s, according to a post on Bud’s Facebook page. Everyone involved seems extremely excited about this new venture. Bud’s was quick to point out that the Danforths would keep all the staff Bud’s currently has, which is great.

The average customer won’t really notice a change in day-to-day operations. Both stores are supplied by Hannaford, so the shelves will look essentially the same. Personally, having met members of the Danforth family a few times, Bud’s will be in good hands in the future.

The change is underway but becomes official in January 2022. Again, most people won’t really notice a change. Danforth has an exceptional reputation so it sounds like a win-win for owners and customers alike. Congratulations to all parties. And to the residents of Pittsfield!

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The owners of Elephante open the Tiki Bar in Venice https://mino-warabi.com/the-owners-of-elephante-open-the-tiki-bar-in-venice/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/the-owners-of-elephante-open-the-tiki-bar-in-venice/

Daily Press Special

Visitors to the newly opened Belles Beach House enjoy a bohemian surf-themed design with windows overlooking the iconic Venice Beach scene. Its tiki bar style is perfect for Windward Circle and its proximity to the square and the beach made it an instant hit.

The spacious new addition to the local restaurant scene has opened at 24 Windward Avenue and between the dining room and its casual lounges. The art provided for the restaurant is by famous artist and Venetian veteran, Larry Bell.

Nicholas Mathers, founder of the Wish You Were Here group, which operates the property, describes this latest addition as “Hawaiian izakaya meets tiki bar.” The Mather Group also has restaurants in Las Vegas, New York and other SoCal locations. The native Australian also adds that it was his travels that inspired Belles. “Island destinations and their approach to hospitality and life have always appealed to me, especially in the culinary sense.

The reference to the Hawaiian izakaya means small plates and that’s the menu for most. You can also find a teriyaki cheeseburger, a lobster roll, and a fantastic bar. The drink menu refers to tropical drinks unique to the Los Angeles area. The cocktails incorporate fresh fruit and mash with an emphasis on currently popular LA spirits: agave drinks that use mescal or tequila rather than traditional rum.

The staff do their own fresh pressing of various fruits and vegetables used in their ‘lean’ daytime cocktails. To keep the menu sustainable, unused freshly squeezed juices are filtered and clarified into fiber, then made into syrups used in some cocktails and nightly slushies.

Belles goes easily from day to night, as do some of the other restaurants in the group (Elephante in Santa Monica and The Eveleigh in West Hollywood). You’ll find a fireplace for those chilly marine layer weather, and after dinner those who stay late for a drink may find themselves dancing the disco ball with a DJ – just like the 70s – and a DJ spins from Thursday to Friday. Sunday night.

Published in partnership with Westside Current.

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The plan to help bar owners and operators succeed https://mino-warabi.com/the-plan-to-help-bar-owners-and-operators-succeed/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 03:25:17 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/the-plan-to-help-bar-owners-and-operators-succeed/

When operating a bar, there are many factors that require attention, time and money. Without a clear plan of action, it is easy to waste valuable resources. Luckily, Jason Williams, Creative Director at Proof & Company, has created a 20 pillar plan that can help bar owners and operators succeed.

Williams, who also heads the company’s bar and drink consultancy, Proof Creative, spoke to us at the Bloody Big Drinks Summit in October.

In this, Williams passed on some of the crucial knowledge he and his team have gained over more than a century of shared experience. Williams and his team identified three pillars as the most vital, prioritizing them above all else.

  1. The conceptual pillar

According to Williams, this is the most important pillar of all. “Defining a compelling concept should be the starting point for launching a bar. This will lead to all other creative and business decisions, ”said Williams.

Although the word “concept” may sound abstract, for Williams the concept of a bar is not esoteric and is defined by two things. The first is “a pragmatic description of what the business is and the customer experience” – is it a lounge, cafe or cocktail bar?

The second is the creation of a story or a theme. Proof Creative calls this story “the golden thread” – a clear concept that runs throughout the bar.

Without a clear concept, a bar and a business can stray from their original purpose, jeopardizing the business model and investment.

Williams pointed out that the Swillhouse Group owns and executes high quality concepts, referring specifically to Baxter’s Inn, in Sydney’s CBD, and the Shady Pines Saloon in Darlinghurst.

  1. Pillar offering drinks

It may seem obvious that drinks are crucial to a bar’s success, but for Williams this mainstay cannot be overstated in its importance.

“A thoughtful, creative and engaging beverage offering is at the heart of a bar’s business model,” said Williams.

House drinks, cocktail menus and exclusive services must go hand in hand with the bar concept, helping patrons to experience the bar’s “golden thread”.

Williams gives specific examples of how a beverage offering can enhance and reinforce a bar’s theme for customers:

“A cocktail menu with a unique concept and story, which extends the theme of the place… A style of house cocktails… a list of spirits, with a selection of specialties to highlight the expertise or the interests of the team .

Balance is crucial. Beverage selections need to work commercially, while attracting and intriguing guests, Williams says. Bar owners shouldn’t overlook brand partnership opportunities when developing a drink list.

A selection of drinks can be used to enhance the central theme of a bar, while developing a sense of occasion for patrons. Williams gives the example of the Melbourne Supper Club. Although renowned for its wine list, this place gave Williams and his friends a sense of occasion with their thoughtful range of dark spirits.

  1. Programming pillar

Nothing to do with computers, Williams defines programming as an “organized activity in the place” – not just events, but the daily rituals that keep the bar running and on track, while retaining its sense of identity. .

Events are also a crucial part of this pillar, with Williams leading the example of liquor and wine clubs, alongside industry and consumer masterclasses.

The third aspect of this pillar is entertainment, with live music, art, and suggested performances.

Williams highlights Maybe Sammy, a cocktail bar in Sydney’s The Rocks district, as an example of a bar with great programming. “The premise is pretty simple, but really fun,” Williams says, continuing, “The concept is a 1950s Las Vegas hotel bar, but without the hotel.”

“If someone had the pleasure of having a drink there, they would attest to the success of the concept.

Williams illustrates how the concept relates to the bar program: “There is playfulness, there is arrogance, there is a certain sense of spectacle. And there are silly games, there are bubbles, there are costumes, and there are choreographed dancers. Everything may seem frivolous, but everyone is talking about it and everyone wants to go back to have that experience.

As always, and as Williams shows, word of mouth marketing and repetition of the custom are essential to the success of sites.

***

Proof Creative is now its own agency model and has a team of five senior bar consultants in Australia, New Zealand, South East Asia and China. Proof Creative works on everything from developing and opening individual bars to continental drink programs and everything in between.

The full discussion, which includes an overview of Proof Creative’s 20 pillars of bar consulting, plus more case studies, new concepts, and place examples, can be found here.

This conversation is part of the Scream Bloody Big Drinks Summit, which contains over 70 presentations, panels and speeches. Tickets giving you full access to the summit cost just $ 249, but some free hospitality-related sessions are available for free.

Get tickets and more information here: https://theshout.com.au/bloody-big-drinks-summit/

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Some Airbnb Owners Eagerly Await Short-Term Rental Order New https://mino-warabi.com/some-airbnb-owners-eagerly-await-short-term-rental-order-new/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 20:02:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/some-airbnb-owners-eagerly-await-short-term-rental-order-new/

Some Airbnb operators in Athens say they are eagerly awaiting legislation that will regulate the use of short-term rentals in Athens.

Athens City Council is currently deliberating on a proposal to regulate short-term rentals, completing a hearing on Monday and conducting a first reading of the group of ordinances at the final meeting of the body.

The draft ordinances establish requirements for short-term rentals. People living in houses anywhere in the city could be granted a permit allowing them to house paying guests for less than 30 days. Non-resident owners cannot have more than three adult renters, plus related children, staying less than 30 days. In addition, non-resident homes must either be located on residential land that borders an R-2 or R-3 or Zone B, or they must face East State Street, Carpenter Street, Lancaster Street or Columbus. Road.

Most of the residential areas in Athens are zoned R-1, the lower density residential area. However, parts of Uptown, the Ohio University campus, and much of the student housing surrounding Mill Street are zoned R-3, allowing for denser housing. The R-2 zones in Athens include portions of West State Street and West Washington Street, as well as a small area on the south side of Richland Avenue.

Supporting council members previously said the short-term rentals ordinance would regulate the presence of short-term rentals, supplement low-income households and generate income for the city through the hotel tax.

There are currently a number of short-term rentals listed on popular sites like Airbnb – 17 according to The Athens NEWS tally. The majority of Airbnb rental properties currently listed appear to be owned and operated by area residents, based on the profiles of property advertisers.

Diane McVey, a resident of Athens, owns and operates two short term rentals in Athens, one on Franklin Avenue and the other on Grovesnor Street. She said she thought the pending legislation “is a pretty good thing.”

“Actually, I think it’s a pretty good thing that they’ve sorted out – it’s a very complicated issue with some people who are very convinced that they don’t allow (short term rentals) in Athens,” he said. McVey said.

She said she believes the compromise that took place during the drafting process reflects residents’ concerns while balancing the rights of owners to use their property as they see fit.

“I think it’s harder for young people to afford houses these days – that’s what we want in Athens,” said McVey. “To have more owners, to have more people buying houses and living there than student tenants. “

Mitch Endick, owner of Athens Furniture on E. State Street and operator of two short-term rentals in Athens (and two outside the city limits), said it was good for the city council to act to regulate the ‘industry.

“Some oversight is better than no oversight – guaranteed – so I think they’re doing a good job,” Endick said.

Endick also said it was “inappropriate” for Airbnbs to enter R-1 (lowest density) neighborhoods except in certain areas such as along E. State Street.

Tyler Schloss, co-owner of White’s Mill, operates part of the historic property as an Airbnb which offers accommodation for eight people. Schloss has stated that the property is in a commercial area, so it will not be subject to the standards applicable to R-1 properties.

He said his company has had positive guest experiences – without any “party house” guests – saying Airbnb’s company and veterinary guests.

Regarding the limits on the maximum number of guests under the new ordinance, Schloss said the company could possibly apply for some sort of waiver.

Ally Rapp Lee, real estate agent at Athens Real Estate, operates an Airbnb at the intersection of Shafer and W. State Street, located in Zone B.

“I mean in general, I’m happy that owners are doing what they reasonably want with their property,” said Rapp Lee.

At the property, she said she had tried to be good stewards of the property out of courtesy to her neighbors (even though she didn’t live there) and had only had one issue with it. a noisy guest since she offered the property for short-term rental.

“I enjoyed it very much – I love Athens and welcoming people to the area is gratifying,” said Rapp Lee.

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REOPENING OF MARATHON’S SUPERIOR CRUST PIZZA HONORS DELAYED OWNERS https://mino-warabi.com/reopening-of-marathons-superior-crust-pizza-honors-delayed-owners/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 03:31:30 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/reopening-of-marathons-superior-crust-pizza-honors-delayed-owners/

One of Marathon’s flagship pizzerias has reopened after a short hiatus. And although her beloved owners Rigoberto and Raisa Gonzalez will no longer greet their loyal customers, their children Ricardo and Raisa Carolina promise that “nothing has changed”.

Rigoberto and Raisa have been a staple in the community since 2001, when the couple chose to move to Marathon to be closer to their first granddaughter Oriana. Together with Ricardo, they bought Upper Crust Pizza in 2001.

Continuing the recipes of the previous owner, Ricardo began to manage the kitchen, maintain and refine existing recipes while ensuring the quality of the homemade pasta. Rigoberto oversaw the operation using his years of work experience, and Raisa focused on the guest experience in the front area of ​​the house.

“My father has been a quality control engineer for most of his life, so for him quality ingredients and the quality of the product we serve was extremely important,” said Raisa Carolina, adding that the restaurant’s presentation received a equal amount. of care. “Cleanliness was special for him and my mother.

“Just little things, like not letting the light bulbs burn out,” Ricardo added. “They seem to be very trivial things, but it’s very important.”

Ricardo, left, and Raisa Carolina Gonzalez are proud to continue their parents’ work with Upper Crust Pizza. ALEX RICKERT / Keys Weekly

When Rigoberto and Raisa died just four minutes apart after battles with COVID-19 in August 2021, Ricardo and Raisa Carolina understandably took some time away from the business. “They left a big gap and we are heartbroken,” said Raisa Carolina. “But my father would have said, ‘You have to keep going,’ and my mother would have said, ‘You have it in you, and you’re going to do it right. “”

The couple carry on their parents’ traditions when they reopen Upper Crust, keeping the same recipes and menu offerings while seeking to fill in the gaps left by the passing of Rigoberto and Raisa. “My mom was the main person making all the desserts in the restaurant, so it will be hard to fill the void, but we are trying,” Ricardo said. “We have the recipes. “

The two of them tried their hand at some of the restaurant’s most popular or exclusive treats, including the banana tortillas and coconut cheesecake. And while the pair have a few ideas for new menu additions going forward, for now, they’re sticking with what they know. “Just simple things, because our menu is a menu that works,” Ricardo said. “I’m still here in the kitchen as a watchdog. Nothing has changed.”

“It’s exactly the same quality,” added Raisa Carolina. “Those looking to have a home cooked meal, that’s what they’re going to find here. “

Appetizers like “Wings of Fire” will continue to be a staple of Upper Crust. ALEX RICKERT / Keys Weekly

According to the Gonzalez, the support they received from their staff and other Marathon residents during a difficult time was unprecedented. “We had an outrageous number of people coming to hug us and praise the quality of the food,” said Raisa Carolina.

They are also quick to credit their staff. “We have the same local employees that we had before, with a few new additions,” said Raisa Carolina. “The old crew stayed with us through thick and thin during the shutdown, and we are very grateful to them for that,” added Ricardo.

And while Upper Crust is now in full swing, Ricardo and Raisa are clearly committed to pursuing the principles and standards set out so clearly by their parents.

“That’s basically why we decided to reopen,” Ricardo said. “To maintain the memory.”

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Pine Valley owners wonder if new short-term rental orders are unfair for some – St George News https://mino-warabi.com/pine-valley-owners-wonder-if-new-short-term-rental-orders-are-unfair-for-some-st-george-news/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 18:45:46 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/pine-valley-owners-wonder-if-new-short-term-rental-orders-are-unfair-for-some-st-george-news/

La Maison Rouge, owned by the Smith family, Pine Valley, Utah, November 5, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

ST. GEORGE – Pine Valley landlords are trying to understand the short-term rental ordinances passed by the Washington County Commission in early October.

A short term rental home owned by Mitzi Sullivan, Pine Valley, Utah, date unspecified | Photo courtesy of Mitzi Sullivan, St. George News

The new ordinances require landlords who manage short-term rentals meet the new requirements, which include a mandate that absent landlords must have a local property management company to oversee their property.

They must also display signs on their units identifying the owner of the building and a phone number for a property manager who is available 24/7, and they must have off-street parking available for tenants. vacation.

These new requirements, said homeowners who spoke to St. George News, may not be viable for all homeowners and may even unfairly punish some. While one family earns a living from short-term rentals, for example, another earns just enough to make ends meet.

The Sullivans: Finding a Balance Between Business and Community

Sullivan said she and her partners – her husband and sister – earn the lion’s share of their livelihood through short-term rentals. Sullivan ran a successful short-term rental business in Park City, northern Utah. The idea of ​​running her own short-term rentals, she says, came to her in 2003.

“My sister and I booked a short-term rental in Park City for a change of scenery,” Sullivan said. “We loved the idea of ​​being able to stay in a unique house almost anywhere in the world. And we wanted to offer this service to travelers looking for an alternative to hotels.

A short term rental home owned by Mitzi Sullivan, Pine Valley, Utah, date unspecified | Photo courtesy of Mitzi Sullivan, St. George News

So she and her sister bought and managed eight short-term rentals in Park City. In 2015, they decided to move to Pine Valley to be closer to their family. They sold their properties in Park City, then bought a property in Pine Valley. One of those properties, Sullivan said, was an “eyesore to Lloyd Canyon”. They demolished a double-decker trailer and built a small cottage in its place that can accommodate six people.

Since then, the Sullivans have made a living by renting out their three short-term rentals. But, said Sullivan, it has always been important to balance business with the needs of the community.

“That’s why we try to keep our business and our properties small,” she said. “We don’t want the wear and tear of party animals, and we don’t want 30 vehicles spilling onto the streets.”

Sullivan said it holds three of the five currently registered short-term rental business licenses in Pine Valley, so its operation will be grandfathered under the new order. But Sullivan wondered if the ordinances passed by the Washington County Commission were out of touch. Especially for homeowners who don’t live on the property all year round and can try to offset the costs of their home.

“To have that suddenly cut off source of income,” Sullivan said, “it must sting.”

The Smiths: trying to break even

Joseph and Katie Smith dreamed of owning a property in Pine Valley, as Katie’s parents had had it for as long as she can remember.

La Maison Rouge, owned by the Smith family, Pine Valley, Utah, November 5, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

Joseph Smith is the director of human resources at the Tuacahn Center for the Arts, while Katie is the artistic director of the Southwest Dance Company. Their dream came true when they bought the Red House on Main Street.

“We have enjoyed our second home for years,” Joseph Smith told St. George News. “We were thrilled when Katie found a way to generate additional income, which would go a long way towards paying our property taxes, as well as the summer water bill. “

But Katie Smith said that while she has spent a lot of time and effort building a stable and viable customer base, she does not have a business license. AirBnB, Smith noted, pays the taxes on behalf of the hosts.

“We’re not slammed with business,” she said. “We don’t make a lot of money. But what we earn really helps us break even every year. “

To that end, Smith said she worries a bad apple will ruin the bushel. She only had one bad guest, which she reported to AirBnB. For its part, AirBnB may ban certain customers who flagrantly violate their policies. For minor infractions, a negative review from an owner like Smith is often enough to warn future hosts of consistently problematic guests.

Smith House Rules, posted at their home, Pine Valley, Utah on November 5, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

“We have rules and guidelines,” Smith said. “We do not allow parties or unruly guests, which we control before renting to them.”

The irony, Joseph Smith added, was that county commissioners often tout the importance of property rights, as they pass those ordinances that undermine those values.

“It feels like we’re all being punished for one or two bad cases,” said Joseph Smith. “Whatever happens, we’ll find out. But my wife built a great little business, and maybe she’s gone. I just wish it wasn’t.

Additional perspectives

Washington County Commissioner Gil Almquist said the county is in the early stages of a feasibility study to determine how the ordinance will affect homeowners and their communities. Still, he said he didn’t feel much sympathy for landowners who operate small businesses without a license.

“We want to explore ways to ensure that the laws we pass are fair,” Almquist told St. George News. “But if you’re making a profit, you’re running a business. And business owners must obtain a business license.

Almquist spoke of a time in 1984 when his small landscaping business was starting to take off.

“I could have chosen to fly under the radar,” Almquist said, “but I decided to get my license.”

“If you forget to get a license,” he continued, “we can’t help you.”

Author, educator and hospitality consultant Julie Davies agrees with Almquist on the need for short-term rental hosts to have business licenses and be subject to code compliance. But she said the current prescriptions are based on misinformation.

“Which,” Davies told St. George News, “may be from AirBnB.”

“We have to remember that AirBnB is a reservation service provider,” Davies continued. “They act like they’re doing everything for you, but they don’t. They are not responsible for remitting taxes to the appropriate entities, and they do not include licenses when you sign up to host your homes.

Ultimately, Davies said, if landlords do the right thing, if they don’t disturb their neighbors or the community, they should be allowed to manage their rentals on a short-term basis. It doesn’t mean they can do whatever they want just because they own a property, she said. For Davies, there is no such thing as “passive income” because property owners and managers “have to be proactive in making sure they follow the code.”

“The county needs to strike a balance between adopting reasonable ordinances, which will allow the right hosts to obtain their licenses,” she said. “It’s an emerging industry that needs to be regulated, but the current regulations are unreasonable. “

“They will get good hosts out of the game,” she added. “Then their reservation calendars will go to the bad hosts operating under the radar. It’s bad for business and the community in the long run.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.

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Elsah’s historic home comes back to life with new owners | Home & Garden https://mino-warabi.com/elsahs-historic-home-comes-back-to-life-with-new-owners-home-garden/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 13:45:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/elsahs-historic-home-comes-back-to-life-with-new-owners-home-garden/





The wooden ceiling in the dining room is original from the house. It is believed that the dining room was the original kitchen. After the couple moved in, plantation shutters were installed on most of the windows.

Hillary Levin, post-expedition


At the same time, the Forsee were planning to leave Florida for Elsah, a small town just north of Alton. “We have lived in the St. Louis area for many years and have always loved this small town,” says Sherri.

They bought vacant land in the village and hired an architect to design and build their dream house, but felt the construction estimates were too much above the median price of a house and that it would not have been. a wise investment.

“When I put the lot up for sale on Zillow, it sold out in 20 minutes to a man who is considering planting apple trees on it. During the conversation, he told me that his mother owned a house in Elsah that she wanted to sell, ”recalls Rick, still amazed at the coincidence. “I was in Florida, but Sherri checked it out and structurally it was in good shape. Visualizing the potential, we bought our house a few days after we sold the lot, ”says Rick.

Over the past two years, the couple have restored the interior, with Rick doing much of the work himself.

Projects included updating the kitchen and bathrooms, relocating electrical outlets, replacing moldings and floor tiles, and installing plantation shutters on all windows.

Plus, every inch of the interior has been painted, including a ceiling Rick painted seven times. “It kept absorbing every coat of paint,” he recalls.

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Homeowner DIY Renovation Uses Recycled Bricks and Plastic to Create Low Environmental Impact Home | Blue Mountain Gazette https://mino-warabi.com/homeowner-diy-renovation-uses-recycled-bricks-and-plastic-to-create-low-environmental-impact-home-blue-mountain-gazette/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 01:30:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/homeowner-diy-renovation-uses-recycled-bricks-and-plastic-to-create-low-environmental-impact-home-blue-mountain-gazette/

A once dark and confined house in Brunswick West, an inner Melbourne suburb, has been refurbished and transformed into a light and airy family home.

The young owners bought the home in 2017, with the vision of creating a beautiful place where they could comfortably expand their families in the future, especially as the couple had a baby on the way.

The clients’ mandate for the DOOD designers was to open up and connect the space to the north facing courtyard.

It was also paramount to bring the much needed natural light into the house, as the existing house was a dark rabbit hole, with no connection to the living spaces.

“They wanted to create a bright and interconnected home, with a wing reserved for visiting parents,” says designer Andrew Stapleton.

“They also wanted the ‘bones’ of the house to stay so they could keep costs down.”

“Because the bones were in reasonable condition, customers were keen to keep the existing impression as much as possible.”

The owners also wanted to participate in the renovation and planned to live in the house as they brought it into the 21st century.

“I remember the site meetings where the clients lived in a small room while the rest of the house was completely removed, the roof and everything,” Andrew says.

“It was a project filled with passion and the end result is much more enjoyable thanks to the dedication of the clients.”

Sustainability was also something the owners wanted to incorporate into the renovation in order to minimize their environmental impact and lower heating and cooling costs.

“A lot of the materials used in this project are recycled,” says Andrew.

“The brick was recycled from the original house and reused for the walls and pavers. The siding is also made from recycled plastic.

“Passive solar orientation has made this house more comfortable, reducing reliance on air conditioning etc. “

The steel courtyard awning was designed to allow climbing plants to come up and create a natural awning that will house the north-facing windows during the summer months.

Interestingly, the house is located a few blocks from the CERES Community Environmental Park in Brunswick East.

The park is a unique non-profit center offering an organic grocery store and café, an urban farm and nursery, as well as environmental education.

No doubt the young family will make it a frequent destination.

Overall, the addition is a deliberate contrast to the front of the house which is crisp white with an expansive and inviting tiled porch.

The garden beds in the front are a nod to the original house, edged with the same recycled bricks used in the back.

  • Produced with BowerBird
  • Design: Andrew Stapleton – DOOD Design
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Homeowner DIY Renovation Uses Recycled Bricks and Plastic to Create Low Environmental Impact Home | Canberra weather https://mino-warabi.com/homeowner-diy-renovation-uses-recycled-bricks-and-plastic-to-create-low-environmental-impact-home-canberra-weather/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 01:30:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/homeowner-diy-renovation-uses-recycled-bricks-and-plastic-to-create-low-environmental-impact-home-canberra-weather/

lifestyle, lifestyle, DIY, Brunswick West, environmental impact, sustainability, DOOD Designers, Andrew Stapleton, home renovations, CERES Community Environment Park

A once dark and confined house in Brunswick West, an inner Melbourne suburb, has been refurbished and transformed into a light and airy family home. The young owners bought the home in 2017, with the vision of creating a beautiful place where they could comfortably expand their family in the future, especially as the couple had a baby on the way. The clients’ mandate for the DOOD designers was to open up and connect the space to the north facing courtyard. It was also paramount to bring the much-needed natural light into the house, as the existing house was a dark rabbit hole, with no connection to the living spaces. “They wanted to create a bright, interconnected home with a wing reserved for visiting parents,” says designer Andrew Stapleton. “They also wanted the ‘bones’ of the house to stay so they could keep costs down.” “Because the bones were in reasonable condition, customers were keen to keep the existing impression as much as possible.” The owners also wanted to participate in the renovation and planned to live in the house as they brought it into the 21st century. “I remember the site meetings where the clients lived in a small room while the rest of the house was completely removed, the roof and everything,” Andrew says. “It was a project filled with passion and the end result is much more enjoyable thanks to the dedication of the clients.” Sustainability was also something the owners wanted to incorporate into the renovation in order to minimize their environmental impact and lower heating and cooling costs. “A lot of the materials used in this project are recycled,” says Andrew. “The brick work was recycled from the original house and reused for the walls and pavers. The siding is also made from recycled plastic.” The passive solar orientation has made this house more comfortable, reducing the use of air conditioning, etc. the steel awning in the yard was designed to allow climbing plants to climb and create a natural awning that will house the north facing windows during the summer months Interestingly, the house is located a few blocks away of the CERES community environmental park in Brunswick East. The park is a unique non-profit center offering an organic grocery store and café, an urban farm and nursery, as well as environmental education. No doubt the young family will make it a frequent destination. Overall the addition is a deliberate contrast to the front of the house which is crisp white with an inviting extended tiled porch.The garden beds in the front are a nod to the house original, lined with the same recycled bricks used at the back.

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Homeowner DIY Renovation Uses Recycled Bricks and Plastic to Create Low Environmental Impact Home | Review of northern beaches https://mino-warabi.com/homeowner-diy-renovation-uses-recycled-bricks-and-plastic-to-create-low-environmental-impact-home-review-of-northern-beaches/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 01:30:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/homeowner-diy-renovation-uses-recycled-bricks-and-plastic-to-create-low-environmental-impact-home-review-of-northern-beaches/

A once dark and confined house in Brunswick West, an inner Melbourne suburb, has been refurbished and transformed into a light and airy family home.

The young owners bought the home in 2017, with the vision of creating a beautiful place where they could comfortably expand their family in the future, especially as the couple had a baby on the way.

The clients’ mandate for the DOOD designers was to open up and connect the space to the north facing courtyard.

It was also paramount to bring the much needed natural light into the house, as the existing house was a dark rabbit hole, with no connection to the living spaces.

“They wanted to create a bright and interconnected home with a wing reserved for visiting parents,” says designer Andrew Stapleton.

“They also wanted the ‘bones’ of the house to stay so they could keep costs down.”

“Because the bones were in reasonable condition, customers were keen to keep the existing impression as much as possible.”

The owners also wanted to participate in the renovation and planned to live in the house as they brought it into the 21st century.

“I remember the site meetings where the clients lived in a small room while the rest of the house was completely removed, the roof and everything,” Andrew says.

“It was a project filled with passion and the end result is much more enjoyable thanks to the dedication of the clients.”

Sustainability was also something the owners wanted to incorporate into the renovation in order to minimize their environmental impact and lower heating and cooling costs.

“A lot of the materials used in this project are recycled,” says Andrew.

“The brick was recycled from the original house and reused for the walls and pavers. The siding is also made from recycled plastic.

“Passive solar orientation has made this house more comfortable, reducing reliance on air conditioning etc. “

The steel courtyard awning was designed to allow climbing plants to come up and create a natural awning that will house the north-facing windows during the summer months.

Interestingly, the house is located a few blocks from the CERES Community Environmental Park in Brunswick East.

The park is a unique non-profit center offering an organic grocery store and café, an urban farm and nursery, as well as environmental education.

No doubt the young family will make it a frequent destination.

Overall, the addition is a deliberate contrast to the front of the house which is crisp white with an expansive and inviting tiled porch.

The garden beds at the front are a nod to the original house, edged with the same recycled bricks used at the back.

  • Produced with BowerBird
  • Design: Andrew Stapleton – DOOD Design
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