Guesthouse owners – Mino Warabi http://mino-warabi.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mino-warabi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Guesthouse owners – Mino Warabi http://mino-warabi.com/ 32 32 Owners use the same builder more than a dozen times https://mino-warabi.com/owners-use-the-same-builder-more-than-a-dozen-times/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/owners-use-the-same-builder-more-than-a-dozen-times/
Owners of this Havelock North home have commissioned Design Builders (HB) over 12 times.  Their latest home won the $750,000 to $1 million New Home category in the regional Master Builders awards.

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Owners of this Havelock North home have commissioned Design Builders (HB) over 12 times. Their latest home won the $750,000 to $1 million New Home category in the regional Master Builders awards.

Repeat business is a sure sign that you are getting something right. And so it is with builders.

A builder in the 2022 Central North Island, East Coast and Hawke’s Bay Registered Master Builders House of the Year – Design Builders (HB) – competition completed over 12 jobs for homeowners in Havelock North which won the New Home $750,000 – $1 Million Category and a Gold Award.

“When you’re asked to build for the same client more than a dozen times, that must say something good about the homes you’re building,” the judges noted. “There was obviously a good understanding of the clients brief as this bespoke two bedroom home reflected their style and clearly delivered everything they wanted.”

Exposed white painted trusses and a high glazed gable are the main features of the large open plan family living space.

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Exposed white painted trusses and a high glazed gable are the main features of the large open plan family living space.

The exterior features painted plywood and wooden slats, “which complement the design nicely.” Inside, large windows and skylights flood the home with natural light.

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“This house has been well built, with great attention to all finishes and paint jobs,” the judges said.

There is a classic country feel to the Havelock North home kitchen.

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There is a classic country feel to the Havelock North home kitchen.

Other big winners are modern country homes that pay homage to scenic beauty.

A spectacular house in New Plymouth, built by Petersen and Barnes, has won the Supreme House of the Year award for the area. The project also won the $1.5-2 million New Home category, the Plumbing World Bathroom Excellence Award and the Scafit Outdoor Living Excellence Award.

This home features a mix of exterior cladding materials that complement the simplistic architectural form of the box. Standout features of this home include the guest bathroom with a sculptural basin and outdoor spaces that were designed for family living.

This spectacular New Plymouth home, built by Petersen and Barnes, won the regional Supreme House of the Year award.

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This spectacular New Plymouth home, built by Petersen and Barnes, won the regional Supreme House of the Year award.

The New Plymouth home opens to a pool and spa.

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The New Plymouth home opens to a pool and spa.

Most Expensive Build – $4+ Million

The most expensive build in these awards went to a new home overlooking the Tukituki River in Patangata, central Hawke’s Bay. The house, built by Davcon, won the New Home over $4 Million category, the Gas Hub Kitchen Excellence Award, the Pink Batts Craftsmanship Award, the Resene Eco.Decorator Interior Design Award and a Gold Award.

The judges described the construction, which incorporates recycled objects from around the world, as “impressive”.

This new home in Central Hawke's Bay, by Davcon, won the New Home over $4 Million category, the Gas Hub Kitchen Excellence Award, the Pink Batts Craftsmanship Award, the Resene Eco.Decorator Interior Design Award and a Gold Award.

Provided

This new home in Central Hawke’s Bay, by Davcon, won the New Home over $4 Million category, the Gas Hub Kitchen Excellence Award, the Pink Batts Craftsmanship Award, the Resene Eco.Decorator Interior Design Award and a Gold Award.

This is Davcon's award-winning Central Hawke's Bay home kitchen.

Provided

This is Davcon’s award-winning Central Hawke’s Bay home kitchen.

“This was a large and challenging project, which required careful planning to accommodate all the contractors and departments involved. The end result is an exceptional home, which has been beautifully built.

Sloped ceilings provide openness, with a bright and airy family living space. Other special features include the kitchen with handcrafted cabinetry which forms the centerpiece of the room. A large pantry, laundry room and cloakroom are positioned behind the kitchen.

A covered outdoor living space with fireplace allows you to enjoy it in all seasons.

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A covered outdoor living space with fireplace allows you to enjoy it in all seasons.

Avenue Construction has won the APL Sustainable and Environmental Excellence Award and a Silver Award for a house in Fitzherbert, Palmerston North.

“The owners clearly went into this project with the future in mind,” the judges said. “Conscious choices were made with their architect throughout the project to improve the design, running costs and life cycle of the house.

“To list a few attributes, this home features thermally broken aluminum double glazed joinery with low emissivity glazing, increased insulation throughout, photovoltaic panels with battery backup and solar hot water.

The APL Award for Sustainable and Environmental Excellence was won by Avenue Construction, who built this house in Fitzherbert, Palmerston North.

Provided

The APL Award for Sustainable and Environmental Excellence was won by Avenue Construction, who built this house in Fitzherbert, Palmerston North.

Palmerston North's large kitchen offers an exceptional amount of storage.

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Palmerston North’s large kitchen offers an exceptional amount of storage.

“This home has been customized to meet today’s owner requirements, but future-proofed in many ways to accommodate changing lifestyles.”

A full list of winners can be viewed on the Registered Master Builders House of the Year website.

THINGS

Every child’s dream – a long slide that goes from inside to outside the house and back again. Calley Homes’ award-winning Master Builders home is in Mount Maunganui.

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Arlington Inn Has New Owners and Plans to Expand Offerings | Company https://mino-warabi.com/arlington-inn-has-new-owners-and-plans-to-expand-offerings-company/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/arlington-inn-has-new-owners-and-plans-to-expand-offerings-company/

ARLINGTON — It’s been a little over a month since Buzz Kanter purchased The Arlington Inn. But it didn’t take long for Kanter and his partner, Tabetha Hammer, who met in the world of motorcycle collecting and restoration, to realize just how difficult life as a Vermont innkeeper can be. hectic.

How hectic? The champagne set aside to celebrate their closure on the historic property is still parked in the fridge, waiting for a time when they can pause to mark their purchase of one of Arlington’s most historic landmarks.

“We closed the place at 11 a.m. on a Friday. That night we logged 12 rooms and it hasn’t stopped since,” Hammer said. “Our second weekend of ownership, we hosted a dinner party for the Equinox Hill Climb group for 80 people.”

The bubbly may have to wait a bit longer. The hostel, which serves breakfast to guests, plans to open to paying guests from October 6. The company also plans to hire a licensed massage therapist and is taking bookings for appointments starting Oct. 3.

“I get rave reviews for our breakfasts from our customers,” Kanter said. “We wanted healthy and fresh and we try to use local ingredients when possible.”

To that end, the hostel is looking for workers to join the team and work to revitalize the property while keeping it running for paying guests. Fall leaf season is already well booked, they said.

The property was purchased by River Run Properties LLC, of ​​which Kanter is principal, for $1,199,000 from Eric Berger, according to records filed with the Arlington Clerk’s Office. Closing was July 29.

Looking around the four-acre property, there’s plenty of evidence that Kanter, Hammer and their team have been busy. Several trees were felled, opening up views across the four-acre property. Overgrown bushes next to houses have been reduced. Inside, the entrance has been redesigned to bring the reception desk into the entrance hall.

They also uncover history in every nook and cranny, including a 19th-century guest register.

Kanter came to the hospitality industry having already retired from the publishing industry. Coming from a family in the publishing business – Dell Magazines and Penny Press, which his mother founded – Kanter edited and published classic motorcycle magazines until 2020.

Kanter, who has owned a home in West Arlington for eight years, learned that the Arlington Inn was for sale and went to have a look.

“We walked in and walked around, and I would say the best word is we were ‘enchanted.’ This is an amazing property,” Kanter said. “We walked around and every room was a discovery. “

If that wasn’t enough, Kanter was sold when he met his potential new neighbors.

“We met the people of Arlington Common, who are doing an incredible job of revitalizing and creating a new asset in the city,” he said.

And although the inn, circa 1848, kept Kanter and Hammer busy, they see great things ahead of them for the company and for their city.

“We love the potential. We didn’t want to invest all that time and money into something that no one will appreciate. The feeling is that Arlington is having a renaissance. People are investing in the city, growing it.”

So far, local reception of all the work has been positive, Kanter said. He was present on Saturday when the inn held a sale in its barn, behind the main inn and shed, during Norman’s Attic Fall Fest.

“We must have had 20 or more people say, ‘I’ve lived here all my life and never knew there was a barn here,'” he said.

Kanter and Hammer met at a high-end motorcycle show – she was manager of the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance, he was a judge.

After getting his start as a photographer for United Press International, Kanter worked for his parents’ publishing houses, until he got his master’s degree in business administration and started his own motorcycle magazine, Old. Bike Journal, as part of his thesis project. A member of the American Motorcycle Association Hall of Fame, Kanter purchased American Iron Magazine, editing and publishing that magazine and several others through 2020, when, he said, the COVID pandemic “fundamentally brought down our advertisers.

If the Arlington Inn was a classic car, what kind of car would it be? Hammer thought about it for a moment, and she had a remarkably specific answer: a 1911 Oldsmobile Touring Limited seven-passenger car, bought at auction for $1.65 million in 2007. One of Hammer’s friends was the caretaker of the car.

Why? This 1911 Olds was considered the only completely original, unrestored example of its kind – and only 159 were built that year. At the time of the auction, Hammer recalled, there was significant debate in the classic car world about whether it should be restored so it could run, or left completely original.

“A fully stock car is only fully stock once – and if you start fixing it, how far will you go?” said Hammer. “I think a place like this is very much in the same vein. And we’re going into this after several people have already done their thing.

But in the automotive world, she explained, there is a “sympathetic restoration”, which involves keeping as much of the original as possible while still running and running it like a car – the thing for which it was built.

“So I think a place like this has the same spirit,” she said. “You want to do with it what you have to do to exploit it. Operate it as a hostel, as a good place to live, while trying to do everything you can to maintain this originality, preserve the areas that can be preserved. »

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Colorado newspapers need new models, better owners https://mino-warabi.com/colorado-newspapers-need-new-models-better-owners/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 07:30:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/colorado-newspapers-need-new-models-better-owners/

The annual Colorado Press Association awards ceremony is usually a feel-good affair for state newspapers, a recognition of quality journalism from publications of all sizes, from the Front Range to the Four Corners.

Normally, the event and the association’s annual convention are an occasion for back-patting and journalistic pride. This is an opportunity for the association’s 150 media to celebrate the best reports, writings, photos and design from the previous year. This would generally not be the place to mark the destruction of a historic newspaper.

But that’s exactly what’s unwittingly planned for tonight’s awards ceremony at Coors Field, where The Aspen Times is set to take home nine awards for five reporters. None of the five work at the Times today. We’ve all been forced out of office, or fired, since West Virginia-based Ogden Newspapers bought The Times in January along with the rest of Swift Communications’ newspapers in Colorado, Utah and California.

The Aspen Times ghost ship is currently down to a single full-time reporter.

Award-winning Times staffers were told we had won something from the press association in May (they don’t reveal what job or category until the public ceremony).

The news came during a particularly tumultuous time at the newspaper. The expected disruption of ownership change had turned into a worrying new phase of corporate censorship. The editorial team had been ordered by Ogden not to write about a controversial development on Aspen Mountain on the heels of Soviet-born billionaire developer Vladislav Doronin suing the paper for its coverage of him. Doronin two months earlier had purchased an acre of land for the development of the Gorsuch Haus ski base, buying it from Jeff Gorsuch and his partners for $76 million. Gorsuch had paid $10 million for it less than eight months earlier.

The day we learned we had won awards, the editorial staff of The Times staged a contentious newsroom meeting with two Ogden representatives who had come to Aspen to discuss the muzzling of coverage. News of the awards ahead of the meeting offered a fleeting moment of pride amid much degradation under Ogden.

Times editor David Krause (now Colorado Sun staff editor) had already resigned and was a weekend away from his last day. The talented photographer Kelsey Brunner, the only photographer on the newspaper team, was soon to post her opinion as well. I was hired to replace Krause – then fired in June for posting an opinion on Ogden’s leading Doronin-related columns. Veteran journalist Scott Condon, who had written for the Times for 35 years, resigned at the end of June and brought his vast experience to rival Aspen Daily News. Hardworking young journalist and food columnist Kaya Williams left soon after; she recently took a position at Aspen Public Radio.

Our names will appear on the Colorado Press Association awards on Saturday, but do not appear on the flagpole of The Times.

I don’t know which Ogden-paid official might be at today’s ceremony claiming the award certificates, or if they’ll bother to show up. I won’t be there, but I hope the disconcerting acknowledgment of the Times’ good work before Ogden will provide a moment for the corps of state reporters gathered at the banquet to recognize what has been lost here and the fragility of local news institutions. .

And, more importantly for the public, I hope it will serve as a catalyst for action to find new models or better owners for the newspapers telling the story of Colorado communities and holding the powerful accountable.

These will be the last Colorado Press Association awards covering the pre-Ogden media landscape in Colorado.

The decimation of the Aspen Times newsroom was dramatic and eerie and became very public this summer after I was fired. Less public were the struggles of reporters from the other 10 Colorado newspapers Ogden bought across ski country and the West Rim.

They may not have had their reporting silenced by Ogden to appease a billionaire developer, as we did at The Times. And they may not have invited the national press to cover the fallout, like we did. But their communities are still losing out as the papers have suffered turnover and attrition of reporters and editors since Ogden’s takeover as they gave up their housing for the workforce and prepare to leave their newsroom buildings (Ogden did not buy them when they bought these newspaper companies).

Without journalists on the local beat, readers and the public interest cannot be properly served. So tonight, let Colorado’s media toast to what they had in 2021 — then let’s get back to work finding a way forward for local news.


Andrew Travers of Aspen is a journalist and former editor of the Aspen Times.

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BizHawk: Owners of Bennett’s Toys and Educational Materials in Santa Barbara Calling It Quits | Company https://mino-warabi.com/bizhawk-owners-of-bennetts-toys-and-educational-materials-in-santa-barbara-calling-it-quits-company/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 05:37:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/bizhawk-owners-of-bennetts-toys-and-educational-materials-in-santa-barbara-calling-it-quits-company/

BizHawk is published weekly and includes articles of interest to the business community. Share your company news, including employee announcements and staff moves, via email [email protected].

An era has come to an end for several generations of South Coast families.

Bennett’s Toys & Educational Materials in Santa Barbara is going bankrupt and closing permanently by December.

A rent increase is a common reason businesses move or close, but landlords Kurt and Lisa Richter made the decision to close before the end of the lease at the end of the year. They want to spend more time with their daughters, aged 10 and 15. Lisa Richter’s father also passed away recently. They say they plan to focus on their family.

On Monday, they hung a banner that read: “Store Closing.”

“The customers were great,” said Kurt Richter. “Just interacting with them was a pleasure. We had some great customers who became friends, in a way. That’s probably what we’ll miss the most.”

For over 50 years, Bennett’s has been a destination for toys, books, dolls, posters and school supplies. The store, in its heyday, occupied a prime spot in the Magnolia Mall, near Woody’s BBQ and across from a grocery store parking lot. But five years ago, the original owner, Vernon Moore, sold the store following a rent increase. He sold it to the Richters, who moved the Bennett’s to the back of the mall.

It wasn’t the same thing. The store was near a smoking room and out of sight of most travelers.

“That probably didn’t help us,” Richter said. “We were a stone’s throw from the other place. People looked at where the old place was, but never tried to find us.”

The store’s demise was caused by other factors. Online shopping, the new target in Goleta, and location all played a role in the company’s results. Richter said even the vendors began to cause problems for the small store.

“For smaller stores, it’s getting harder and harder to compete,” Richter said. “There is absolutely no way.”

He said sellers want bigger orders.

“For a small store, you just can’t buy in large quantities like they would like,” Richter said.

No other store like Bennett exists in town. The bright and airy space is part library, part toy store, part classroom, wrapped in a family atmosphere created by the owners.

It’s the end of an era, but for the Richters, it’s also a new beginning.

“We have kids and we don’t have time to vacation with them,” he said. “We just had to make a decision on what we were going to do. It was just the best for our family at that time.”

Store items are priced at 20% off.

Kyle’s kitchen turns to beer

Beer sells.

Kyle’s Kitchen has opened a faucet room.

The company had a soft opening Thursday night. It sells local craft beer and wine.

The Tap Room occupies the space that was once Kyle’s Protein Grill.

Kyle's Kitchen has opened a faucet
Click to view larger

Kyle’s Kitchen has opened a faucet room.

Thursday through Sunday, the tap room will offer beers for $4 and $2 off others. Menu items include “Kyle’s lager”, house lager, and “Kyle’s IPA”. It also offers seltzers, ciders and kombucha.

Also on the menu are a variety of Napa Valley and Central Valley wines.

Kyle’s Tap Room is at 7000 Hollister Ave. in Santa Barbara.

Peril BBQ Beans

Beans BBQ in Santa Barbara took to social media this week for help. Business must resume.

“As many of you can imagine, renting on State Street is no small feat, and like the hundreds of small businesses that have tried and failed before us, we are about to lose our little piece of paradise on State and Victoria,” the company said. posted on Instagram.

Kristi Bean and her daughter, Jenniffer Bean, opened the restaurant at 1230 State St. in March.

“We say this not to scare anyone or make them sad, but to give you a taste of the reality of being a small business trying its best to be successful in this city,” they wrote. “No matter how good the food we provide, how great the service, etc., if people don’t come through the doors daily and frequent our establishment, we won’t survive here any longer.”

They said they wouldn’t go down without a fight.

“Please keep coming to visit us for food, order online for takeout when you feel like it, and spread the word,” the message read. “We’ve only been here six months and would love to continue to stay here for years to come and become an integral part of the downtown business family. Thank you for the memories, the meals, the laughs. We love Santa Barbara and we want to stay as long as we can!”

It’s a beautiful life

The Good Life, bottle shop, tasting room and bar in Solvang, celebrates its 10th anniversary.

Lisa and Alfred Mesa from The Good Life.
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Lisa and Alfred Mesa from The Good Life. (Courtesy picture)

Alfred and Lisa Mesa founded The Good Life to provide a tasting room for small independent producers.

“To say we are grateful and humbled by our success would be an understatement,” Lisa Mesa said in a statement. “We are also grateful to all the people who have supported us throughout our journey. We believe that our personalized and individual approach to service is key. With so many selections, customers can be overwhelmed. We’re both here to help every customer find something to suit their taste and budget.”

The Good Life offers tastings, glass service and take-out bottles from more than 100 unique producers of local small-production wines and Californian independent beer, all nestled in the underground cellar with an outdoor patio, according to a press release. .

The Good Life is located at 1672 Mission Drive in Solvang. It is open from noon to 9 p.m. from Sunday to Wednesday and from noon to 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday

The company is hosting a 10th anniversary celebration from September 30 to October 2.

Hiring doctor

Dr. Allison Pontius and Dr. Alain Polynice have joined Turner Medical Arts.

Dr. Allison Pontius and Dr. Alain Polynice
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Dr Allison Pontius and Dr Alain Polynice (Courtesy photo)

Dr. Allison Pontius is board certified in three specialties: Facial Plastic Surgery, Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck (ENT) Surgery, and Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine.

For the past 15 years, she has focused her career solely on maximizing facial beauty through non-surgical, minimally invasive injections with neuromodulators and fillers, according to a press release.

Dr. Alain Polynice is known as “Mom’s Makeover Specialist,” according to a press release. She is a board-certified plastic surgeon whose practice focuses on cosmetic breast and body surgery with particular expertise in “Mommy Makeovers” and body sculpting.

They join Dr Duncan Turne, owner of Turner Medical Arts, 1250 Coast Village Road.

– Noozhawk writer Joshua Molina can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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On Martha’s Vineyard, a rush of migrants, from restaurateurs to Spanish students https://mino-warabi.com/on-marthas-vineyard-a-rush-of-migrants-from-restaurateurs-to-spanish-students/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 12:39:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/on-marthas-vineyard-a-rush-of-migrants-from-restaurateurs-to-spanish-students/
Martha’s Vineyard reacts to surprise arrival of planes loaded with migrants

At first, Tim Dobel felt somewhat helpless. The migrants’ needs for shelter and medical care, not to mention the immigration policy that brought them to the island, were well beyond his control. But he and the staff at Mocha Mott’s in Vineyard Haven could make sure they had a hot cup of coffee to keep them warm.

“These people are so exhausted and feel used by whoever sent them here,” said Dobel, co-owner of Vineyard Haven cafe. “It’s the least we can do.”

Dobel said it was after Wednesday’s close when he and his team stepped up. Her daughter, Casey Engley, who is six months pregnant, lit the brewers, filled a few cartons with fresh coffee and delivered it to St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, where the migrants had settled for the night.

Dobel dropped off a second batch early Thursday morning, where doctors had already arrived to assess the health of migrants. Boxes of pastries had been dropped off and breakfast sandwiches were on their way.

“The Vineyard is really stepping up,” he said. “It can feel a little cold here at times, but the people who live here are very warm and caring for each other and those in need.”

In the face of what elected officials called “a cruel ruse” and a “shameless political stunt”, everyone from teachers to shop workers to pensioners banded together to help the migrants. Danny Segal, owner of Edgartown Pizza, received a phone call from Martha’s Vineyard Community Services around 5:30 p.m. Wednesday asking for 10 extra-large pizzas.

He wasn’t sure who the order was for – only that there were dozens of people, including children, who suddenly needed food. So he offered the organization the same deep discount he gives to schools and nonprofits.

It was only later that Segal learned of the extraordinary circumstances that were unfolding. at the church at the end of the street.

“If I had known, I probably wouldn’t have charged anything,” Segal said. “Edgartown Pizza is here to help. This is what we do.”

Cecilia Brennan, who works at Martha’s Vineyard Community Services, has been helping migrants since they arrived and called the response “a real community effort”.

Brennan said a number of restaurants like Segal’s have offered to donate food, and the Island Food Pantry has coordinated efforts to donate groceries.

Polly Toomey, owner of Among the Flowers Cafe, said she and her staff delivered quiches and fresh fruit to the church on Thursday, where organizers were “overwhelmed” with donations.

On Friday, she plans to bring even more quiches, along with “French toast” and other breakfast items.

“I hope people do it for us too,” Toomey said.

At Tony’s Market, a local grocery store, volunteers stopped to buy coffee, hot chocolate and milk to take home. General Manager Kelly Hill said the deli counter is also on standby to make sandwiches if needed.

“We want to rally behind these people who have kind of arrived in the middle of nowhere,” Hill said. “We’re just going to come together to see what we can do to get them to a better place.”

Sean Ready, owner of Edgartown Meat and Fish Market, said he had been on the phone with the Red Cross, offering whatever might be needed.

“We’re just waiting to see if they need anything,” Ready said. “It’s a small community here, so we’ll see what we can do to help.”

Outside the church where the migrants were staying, a steady stream of cars drove down Winter Street to drop off food, clothing and other supplies, or to help with translation.

Rob Donovan showed up with a check for $100 to Martha’s Vineyard Community Services.

“We love that they’re here, and I guess what we’re doing is making a political statement to Ron Desantis,” he said of the Florida governor who said he was responsible. of sending migrants to the wealthy island retreat, the latest such protest against the Biden administration’s immigration policies. “That’s what we’re going to do to show people that they’re welcome in this community.”

Wesley Doyle, general manager of the Vineyard Square Hotel and Suites, dropped off a box of toothpaste, toothbrushes, soap, “and all the amenities we usually provide to our hotel guests.”

Maria Sanchez Roa, a student at Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School, was in her room on Wednesday “ignoring homework” when her mother came in and told her the migrants had arrived and Spanish translators were needed.

When she arrived at the church, she had “no idea” what she was supposed to do. But she started talking with the migrants “to help them and help them feel more comfortable”.

“I’m happy to be able to communicate and to be an outlet, and to help them express how they feel and to be there to talk to them and support them,” she said. “Once in a while it hits me, you know? I’m here to help these people and help them have a good time.

Lisa Belcastro, director of the Winter Homes homeless shelter, said they had received more community help than they could handle. Outside the church, around a donation drop-off and volunteer registration table, residents asked how they could get involved.

“I think we’re pretty covered,” said one volunteer.


Spencer Buell can be contacted at spencer.buell@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @SpencerBuell. Brittany Bowker can be reached at brittany.bowker@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @brittbowker and on Instagram @brittbowker.

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LAS VEGAS HARD HAT LOUNGE ANNOUNCES NEW OWNERS https://mino-warabi.com/las-vegas-hard-hat-lounge-announces-new-owners/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 12:51:44 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/las-vegas-hard-hat-lounge-announces-new-owners/

Las Vegas’ iconic dive bar, the Hard Hat Lounge, is officially in the hands of hometown hero Frank Sidoris and pizza-lebrity Robby Cunningham. The dynamic duo and longtime best friends breathe new life into the institution starting today, September 12, with special opening hours from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Sticking to tradition and all the little details that make the Hard Hat Lounge a beloved piece of downtown Las Vegas, Sidoris and Cunningham promise to keep the bar’s loyal fans happy while adding live music and fun surprises. . The lounge has great bar offerings, all sports – including all VGK and Raiders games – and the best Detroit-style pizza in town, Guerrilla Pizza, drawing locals and tourists, regulars and new friends to hang out. relax, have a drink and enjoy a good pie with friends.

Guerrilla Pizza

Hard Hat’s signature Guerrilla Pizza exploded after Cunningham came up with the crazy idea of ​​a free pizza to test out his deep cheesy creations. He started @freepizzadtlv to fulfill his need for quality, authentic Detroit-style pizza in Vegas and before long pizza lovers were asking for more. Guerrilla Pizza at the Hard Hat Lounge will offer classic Detroit pizzas, with all the traditional toppings, as well as $7 hot breads like Wild Bread, gorilla knots and Hot churros; $7 Poutine, Parmesan Where Garlic Parmesan fashions; and $10 wings with your choice of Dirty, Frank’s Red Hot, Sriracha, Garlic Parmesan Where Mike’s hot honey.

“I’m beyond thrilled to be taking over one of the oldest and coolest dive bars in the entire city of Las Vegas,” Cunningham said. “To have walked into the kitchen two years ago on a whim and brought so much success to the bar with the pizza I was cooking at home is such an accomplishment. I’m excited to explore my entrepreneurial spirit with my best friend and make this bar even more successful than it’s ever been. The pizza and drinks will get even better with Frank and I driving.

Drinks, music and a rockstar

Sidoris, Vegas’ own rock star, recently toured the world as guitarist for Slash with Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators and Mammoth WVH. Born and raised in Las Vegas, Sidoris has a genuine love and appreciation for a great dive bar with good vibes and great music, but is committed to preserving the historic charm of the lounge.

“Owning a bar in Vegas is exciting, but owning a piece of Las Vegas history is something else entirely,” Sidoris said. “My partner Robby and I couldn’t be more motivated to maintain what makes the Hard Hat a fixture in the downtown Vegas community and accentuate its historic value.”

All beers, except specialty beers, will be served in 22oz mugs. Exciting activations will include top guest bartenders, tap dance takeovers, game nights on Tuesdays and karaoke on Wednesdays. Live music inside, plus great shows outside on a bigger stage are coming soon.

Current Hard Hat Lounge promotions include:

  • Happy Hour daily from 1-3 p.m. and midnight until late with $1 off beers and drinks on call
  • Industry night on Monday with 10% off tab for industry guests
  • All day, every day $1 off drinks for construction workers

Hard Hat Lounge is located at 1675 S Industrial Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89102. Hard Hat is open 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday.

About Hard Hat Lounge

Founded in 1962, Hard Hat Lounge is one of the oldest continuously operating bars in Southern Nevada. A downtown institution, featuring the cult-favorite Guerrilla pizza, has new owners and new life in 2022, with more to come. Visit the Hard Hat Lounge in the Arts District at 1675 S Industrial Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89102. For more information, please follow on Instagram @hardhatloungelv.

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How not to behave in a foster home, according to the owners themselves https://mino-warabi.com/how-not-to-behave-in-a-foster-home-according-to-the-owners-themselves/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 13:31:53 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/how-not-to-behave-in-a-foster-home-according-to-the-owners-themselves/

Unlike hotels, homestays are often found in remote or rural areas, where the natural environment remains untouched. The communities in these areas have a certain way of life and as a guest this is something you need to be aware of. “Many guests don’t dress appropriately. I live in a rural part of Himachal Pradesh and you have to respect that,” says Hooda. “I give disclaimers saying it’s dark at night, there’s a village nearby, there are all kinds of bugs and the house is in a very natural setting,” explains Cardoz. But the customers don’t listen and then later they complain. “You have to know that when you go to a host family, you have to respect the local setting.”

Cardoz plans to give each guest biodegradable trash bags every time they go to the beach so they don’t litter the pristine shores. “They can bring back their waste and I’ll take care of it, that’s fine,” he says.

Don’t trash the house

“We can’t handle people coming in with this legitimate feeling that just because they pay, they can trash your house and someone else will clean up after them,” Hooda says. “People come here, throw their wet towels on the floor and step on them after a bath. It’s not a hotel, it’s a house. I don’t have a laundromat. Josse has another point: “I live in an area that has over 85% humidity. So if you smoke inside — and I’m pretty liberal about smoking — the smell is going to stick to my curtains, rugs, and blankets,” he says. “For a non-smoker, it’s hell and it’s not fair. I don’t have time to buy new laundry and I can’t even dry clean it. But customers don’t think that’s a big deal. Essentially, leave the house in the same condition that you entered it.

Mayascrest, Himachal Pradesh

Don’t be a bad drunk

While many homestay owners are liberal about guests drinking alcohol on-site, what no one agrees with is someone being sloppy or behaving hurt when he drank too much. “I especially hate it when men go potty pissing when they’re drunk,” Hooda says. Although she allows alcohol, to avoid unpleasant situations, Hooda and her daughter are selective with reservations and make sure to speak to every potential guest before confirming their stay. Others prefer to avoid the problem at all costs. “We haven’t asked and we never will ask for a liquor license,” Kudle said. “The moment I say I don’t serve alcohol, that automatically serves as a huge filter. If you’re staying with us and you know how to hold your booze and aren’t disturbing anyone else, we suggest you take your own booze and enjoy yourself.”

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Bedford Estate Owners Jockey for $65 Million on Equestrian Property https://mino-warabi.com/bedford-estate-owners-jockey-for-65-million-on-equestrian-property/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 14:23:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/bedford-estate-owners-jockey-for-65-million-on-equestrian-property/

A photo illustration of 787 South Bedford Road in Bedford (Sotheby’s International Realty, Getty Images)

Got a horse and $65 million sitting down? Some Westchester County property could take care of that.

Sunnyfield Farm in Bedford is asking about $304,000 per acre, with $214 in all. That figure makes it the most expensive list in the city adorned with celebrities, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The property is best suited for a horse and pony show – literally. There are riding facilities throughout the property and several barns with enough stalls for 70 horses. There are indoor and outdoor riding arenas, over 100 acres of paddocks and a Grand Prix course for horses ready to train at the highest level of show jumping.

Thoroughbreds have been bred and bred on the property, some of which go down in the annals of horse racing history. Several horses belonging to the owners, the Nielsen family, competed in the Kentucky Derby. Triple Crown winner American Pharoah sired two foals who lived on the estate.

Krissy Blake of Sotheby's International Realty (Sotheby's)

Krissy Blake of Sotheby’s International Realty (Sotheby’s)

Humans can also feel at home at 787 South Bedford Road. There is a four bedroom main house, a guest house and three smaller staff houses.

Other points of interest on the property include access to a network of local trails and the nearby location of the 75-acre Guard Hill Reserve.

The Nielsen family patriarch bought the estate in 1976 at a bank auction, along with three other families. The Nielsens eventually bought out the other partners, taking control of a property that once belonged to A&P grocery heiress Josephine McIntosh.

The family sells the property because they don’t use it as much as they used to. Krissy Blake of Sotheby’s International Realty has the list.

—Holden Walter-Warner

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Under New Ownership: Harvest Barn Inn Celebrates New Owners | https://mino-warabi.com/under-new-ownership-harvest-barn-inn-celebrates-new-owners/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/under-new-ownership-harvest-barn-inn-celebrates-new-owners/

BELLOWS FALLS, Vt. – The Harvest Barn Inn, located at 16 Web Terrace in Bellows Falls, recently celebrated the arrival of new inn owners Kaelan James Yen Smith and Blessing Yen Smith, who recently arrived in Bellows Falls from California. The couple have been married since 2017 and officially took over ownership of the inn on August 15.

“We took over this Monday and didn’t even close the doors for a night,” Kaelan said. “There was actually a guest who stayed the night during the transition, so she went to bed with one group of innkeepers and woke up with another!”

Blessing is from Southern California and Kaelan from a small town in Northern California, and they met in Los Angeles 12 years ago. Kaelan attended Boston University before moving to Los Angeles, so he was already familiar with New England.

“We’ve spent the last five years thinking about leaving California for a number of reasons related to living a more sustainable life,” Blessing added. “Sustainability from an ecological and lifestyle point of view. But until the pandemic, we never really imagined leaving California. After Covid, we slowed down and thought more holistically about our lives.

Their decision to move was not made quickly, but in the spring of 2001 they decided to quit their jobs and sell their house. After searching in various parts of the country – Oregon, Washington, New Mexico, North Carolina – they began searching in New England and found their way to Vermont.

“After a friend randomly sent us a listing for a large farm in Vermont on 50 acres, it got us looking all over New England, but Vermont kept tugging at our heartstrings. Then Kaelan came across a listing for the Harvest Barn Inn on www.InnShopper.com and it sounded too good to be true…a gorgeous old house on 10 acres overlooking the Connecticut River. It was also a business that had been operating successfully for over 30 years.

Kaelan and Blessing thought that if they bought the inn, they wouldn’t have to look for new jobs because the house and the land would be the new jobs. All of a sudden, the idea of ​​running the inn, welcoming guests, getting the garden back in working order excited them.

“Kaelan traveled to Bellows Falls last spring and fell in love with not just the Inn, but the whole village,” Blessing added. “Joining businesses as diverse as Wunderbar, Rockingham Roasters, Moon Dog Café, The Flatiron Coop, The Opera House, Joy Wah, Windham Antiques Center, Big Red Barn and Halladay’s Flowers, plus the Amtrack running from downtown directly to New York’s Penn Station… we knew right away this was the place for us!”

Despite many updates over the years, the house is 130 years old, so there are plans to refresh the bathrooms, add solar panels on the roof and also work on growing and local sourcing of all the food they serve.

“Rich and Ellen Sager have done an absolutely wonderful job running the Inn for the past five years, so our first priority is to uphold the standard they have set with their hospitality and food. Plus, there are so many amazing farms, dairies, cideries, sugar mills, wineries, and rotisseries nearby that we should be able to get anything we could want without traveling more than 25 miles from Bellows Falls.

“You can’t beat our view of the Connecticut River and we have our own mountain in our backyard. You can literally walk through our orchard, past our pond, take the trail across our creek and up into the forest to see the maples and oaks change color during foliage season.” To learn more about Harvest Barn Inn, please visit www.harvestbarninn.com.

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The Harvest Barn Inn has new owners https://mino-warabi.com/the-harvest-barn-inn-has-new-owners/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://mino-warabi.com/the-harvest-barn-inn-has-new-owners/
Photo courtesy of Harvest Barn Inn

BELLOWS FALLS, Vermont – The Harvest Barn Inn, located at 16 Web Terrace in Bellows Falls, recently celebrated the arrival of new inn owners Kaelan James Yen Smith and Blessing Yen Smith, who recently arrived in Bellows Falls from California. The couple have been married since 2017 and officially took over ownership of the inn on August 15.

“We took over this Monday and didn’t even close the doors for a night,” Kaelan said. “There was actually a guest who stayed the night during the transition, so she went to bed with one group of innkeepers and woke up with another!”

Blessing is from Southern California and Kaelan from a small town in Northern California, and they met in Los Angeles 12 years ago. Kaelan attended Boston University before moving to Los Angeles, so he was already familiar with New England.

“We’ve spent the last five years thinking about leaving California for a number of reasons related to living a more sustainable life,” Blessing added. “Sustainability from an ecological and lifestyle point of view. But until the pandemic, we never really imagined leaving California. After Covid, we slowed down and thought more holistically about our lives.

Their decision to move was not made quickly, but in the spring of 2001 they decided to quit their jobs and sell their house. After searching in various parts of the country – Oregon, Washington, New Mexico, North Carolina – they began searching in New England and found their way to Vermont.

“After a friend randomly sent us a listing for a large farm in Vermont on 50 acres, it got us looking all over New England, but Vermont kept tugging at our heartstrings. Then Kaelan came across a listing for the Harvest Barn Inn on www.InnShopper.com and it sounded too good to be true…a gorgeous old house on 10 acres overlooking the Connecticut River. It was also a business that had been operating successfully for over 30 years.

Kaelan and Blessing thought that if they bought the inn, they wouldn’t have to look for new jobs because the house and the land would be the new jobs. All of a sudden, the idea of ​​running the inn, welcoming guests, getting the garden back in working order excited them.

“Kaelan traveled to Bellows Falls last spring and fell in love with not just the Inn, but the whole village,” Blessing added. “Joining businesses as diverse as Wunderbar, Rockingham Roasters, Moon Dog Café, The Flatiron Coop, The Opera House, Joy Wah, Windham Antiques Center, Big Red Barn and Halladay’s Flowers, plus the Amtrack running from downtown directly to New York’s Penn Station… we knew right away this was the place for us!”

Despite many updates over the years, the house is 130 years old, so there are plans to refresh the bathrooms, add solar panels on the roof and also work on growing and local sourcing of all the food they serve.

“Rich and Ellen Sager have done an absolutely wonderful job running the Inn for the past five years, so our first priority is to uphold the standard they have set with their hospitality and food. Plus, there are so many amazing farms, dairies, cideries, sugar mills, wineries, and rotisseries nearby that we should be able to get anything we could want without traveling more than 25 miles from Bellows Falls.

“You can’t beat our view of the Connecticut River and we have our own mountain in our backyard. You can literally walk through our orchard, past our pond, take the trail across our creek and up into the forest to see the maples and oaks change color during foliage season.” To learn more about Harvest Barn Inn, please visit www.harvestbarninn.com.

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